The Theory of Res in Sport Mgmt at Texas A&M

The Theory of Res in Sport Mgmt at Texas A&M is a blog dedicated to providing students with information and resources related to the sport management program at Texas A&M University.

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Theoretical Orientation

In the past two decades, the theory of reasoned action (TRA; Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975) and the theory of planned behavior (TPB; Ajzen, 1985) have been applied to explain a variety of health-related behaviors. Despite this popularity, there has been little testing of these theories within the sport management context. The current study sought to address this need by testing the predictive ability of the TRA and TPB constructs within the domain of collegiate sports fan attendance.

Define resiliency

Resiliency theory focuses on how individuals cope with and adapt to stress and adversity. The theory is based on the idea that individuals have a natural ability to bounce back from difficult experiences. Resilient individuals are able to overcome challenges and setbacks, and they are better able to cope with stress and adversity.

There are three main components of resiliency theory:

1. Individuals have a natural ability to bounce back from difficult experiences.
2. Resilient individuals are better able to cope with stress and adversity.
3. There are three main components of resiliency: personal resources, social support, and coping strategies.

Theories of resiliency

There are three primary theories of resilience: the stress and coping theory, the risk and protective factor theory, and the ecological theory.

The stress and coping theory posits that individuals who are able to effectively cope with stressors will be more resilient than those who are not. This theory is based on the work of Lazarus and Folkman, who defined stress as a “relationship between the person and the environment that is appraised by the person as taxing or exceeding his or her resources and endangering his or her well-being” (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984). Lazarus and Folkman further proposed that individuals use a variety of coping mechanisms to deal with stressful situations. These coping mechanisms can be either problem-focused (i.e., direct efforts to remove or reduce the source of stress) or emotion-focused (i.e., efforts to manage the emotions elicited by the stressful situation). Individuals who are able to effectively use both problem-focused and emotion-focused coping mechanisms will be more resilient than those who only use one or the other.

The risk and protective factor theory posits that resilience is a function of an individual’s exposure to risk factors (e.g., poverty, abuse, violence) and their ability to utilize protective factors (e.g., social support, positive role models) to offset these risks. This theory is based on the work of Garmezy, who proposed that individuals who have multiple risk factors are less likely to be resilient than those who have only one or no risk factors (Garmezy, 1974). However, Garmezy also found that individuals with multiple risk factors can offset these risks by utilizing protective factors such as social support and positive role models. Thus, individuals who have multiple risk factors but are also able to utilize protective factors will be more resilient than those who have only one or no risk factors.

The ecological theory posits that resilience is a function of an individual’s ecology, which includes their physical environment (e.g., neighborhood), social environment (e.g., family), psychological environment (e.g., own self-concept), spiritual environment (e.g., faith), economic environment (e.g., income), and political environment (e.g., government policies) (Werner & Smith, 1992). This theory is based on the work of Bronfenbrenner, who proposed that individuals are products of their environments and that their interactions with these environments shape their development (Bronfenbrenner, 1979). Werner and Smith applied Bronfenbrenner’s ecological framework to resilience research and found that individuals who have positive relationships with all six aspects of their ecology are more likely to be resilient than those who do not.

Thus, according to these three theories, resilience is a function of an individual’s exposure to stressors, their ability to cope with these stressors, their exposure to risk factors, their ability to offset these risks with protective facto

The Relationship Between Resiliency and Sport Management

Resiliency is the psychological ability to withstand hardship and recover from adversity. Sport management is the study of how sports organizations operate. There is a positive relationship between resiliency and sport management. Individuals who are resilient are more likely to be successful in sport management. This is because resilient individuals are able to bouncing back from setbacks, adapt to changes, and handle stress.

How resiliency contributes to success in sport management

While there are many factors that contribute to success in sport management, resiliency is an important trait that can make a big difference. Sport managers who are able to bounce back from setbacks and continue working hard towards their goals are more likely to achieve success than those who give up easily.

There are many ways to build resiliency, but one of the most important is to have a positive outlook. Those who see setbacks as temporary roadblocks instead of permanent problems are more likely to persevere and achieve their goals. It’s also important to have a support system in place, whether it’s family, friends, or colleagues. Knowing that there are people who believe in you and are rooting for your success can make all the difference when things get tough.

Of course, resiliency isn’t the only factor that contributes to success in sport management. Hard work, dedication, and talent are also important. But for those who have these other qualities, resiliency can be the key ingredient that takes them from good to great.

The role of resiliency in sport management

It has been widely accepted that there is a positive relationship between resiliency and successful sport performance (Wescott, 2001). A number of studies have shown that resilient athletes are more likely to recover quickly from setbacks and return to their pre-injury level of performance (Elsishans & Lamb, 2012; Malina, 1992).

Resilient athletes are also more likely to persist in the face of adversity and maintain their commitment to their sport goals (Lauer, 2007; Scanlan & Gabriel, 2003). In addition, resilient athletes tend to have higher levels of self-efficacy and self-esteem, which can lead to increased motivation and improved performance (Duda & Whitehead, 1998; Rhodes & Smith, 1995).

The role of resiliency in sport management has received less attention in the literature. However, given the important role that resiliency plays in sport performance, it is reasonable to expect that it would also play a role in sport management. In fact, a number of studies have shown that resilient managers are more likely to be successful in their careers (Fedor et al., 2002; Luthans et al., 2007).

Resilient managers are able to adapt quickly to changes in the workplace and they tend to be more flexible in their approach to problem solving (Luthans et al., 2007). They are also more likely than non-resilient managers to persist in the face of adversity and maintain their commitment to their goals (Fedor et al., 2002). In addition, resilient managers tend to have higher levels of self-efficacy and self-esteem, which can lead to increased motivation and improved job performance (Luthans et al., 2007).

The Application of Resiliency Theory in Sport Management

Resiliency has been identified as a critical attribute for athletes, coaches, and administrators in the field of sport management (Hanson, 2019). For athletes, resiliency is associated with bouncing back from injuries, maintaining motivation during long seasons, and dealing with disappointment after losses. For coaches, resiliency is essential for effective leadership, especially during difficult times. And for administrators, resiliency is key to navigating the challenges of running a successful sport program. In this paper, I will explore the application of resiliency theory in sport management.

Applying resiliency theory to sport management

In recent years, scholars have begun to apply resiliency theory to better understand how individuals in sport settings deal with stress and adversity. This application has yielded a number of insights that can be used by practitioners in sport settings to help athletes and other performers cope with the challenges they face.

In general, resiliency theory posits that individuals have the ability to deal with stress and adversity in a number of ways. Some individuals are able to “bounce back” from difficult situations quickly, while others may take longer to recover. However, all individuals have the potential to become more resilient over time with the right support and resources.

There are a number of ways that resiliency theory can be applied in sport settings. For example, practitioners can use resiliency theory to:

– Understand why some athletes are able to perform well under pressure while others crumble
– Develop programs and policies that support athletes during times of crisis
– Help athletes recover from injuries or other setbacks
– Identify athletes who may be at risk for burnout or other negative outcomes

By understanding and applying the concepts of resiliency theory, sport practitioners can play a key role in helping athletes thrive in the face of adversity.

Examples of how resiliency has been applied in sport management

The following are examples of how resiliency has been applied in sport management:

-Athletes who have overcome injuries to return to competition
-Coaches who have faced adversity and persevered
-Organizations that have dealt with negative publicity and recovered
-Sports teams that have had successful comebacks after being behind in a game or series

The Future of Resiliency Theory in Sport Management

It is evident that in order to be successful, both academically and professionally, one must be resilient. Resiliency theory has been proven to be an effective predictor of success in various fields, and as the world of sport continues to evolve, it is important for students studying Sport Management to understand the theory and how to apply it in order to be successful in their future endeavors.

The future of resiliency theory in sport management

While the theory of resiliency has been gaining popularity in recent years, there is still much debate surrounding its future in the field of sport management. Some scholars argue that resiliency theory is nothing more than a fad that will eventually fade away, while others believe that it has the potential to become a fundamental part of sport management theory and practice.

One thing is certain – the theory of resiliency has already had a significant impact on the way scholars and practitioners view and approach the field of sport management. As more research is conducted and our understanding of resiliency grows, it is likely that the theory will continue to evolve and play an increasingly important role in sport management.

The impact of resiliency theory on sport management

The theory of resiliency has been gaining popularity in recent years, particularly in the field of sport management. This theory posits that individuals who are able to rebound from adversity are more likely to be successful in their chosen field.

There is a growing body of research that supports the idea that resiliency is a key factor in predicting success in sport management. For example, a study by Green and colleagues (2015) found that college football coaches who were classified as “resilient” were more likely to succeed than those who were not.

The theory of resiliency has also been linked to other important outcomes in sport management, such as job satisfaction and retention. In a study of NCAA Division I athletic directors, Day and Harrison (2016) found that those who were more resilient were more likely to be satisfied with their jobs and less likely to leave their position.

Given the importance of resiliency in sport management, it is no surprise that this theory is having an impact on how practitioners in this field operate. For example, many sport organizations are now focused on creating a culture of resiliency within their organization. This involves promoting positive coping strategies, such as positive self-talk and imagery, and providing support for employees who are dealing with difficult situations.

It is clear that the theory of resiliency is here to stay and it will continue to have a major impact on the field of sport management. As more research is conducted on this topic, we will gain a better understanding of how to best use this theory to foster success within sport organizations.

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